Sharing Knowledge about Knowledge: Stan Garfield

If you need to know anything about Knowledge Management, Stan Garfield has probably already written about it. This prolific author and speaker has over 400 posts and various books on the topic showing not just his ideas, but also those of multiple people who are dedicated to this discipline.

Stan’s education is in Computer Science, but technology is not his only focus. As a true Knowledge Manager, he built relationships and communities to ensure information and ideas of an organization are captured and shared. In this interview you will learn about all the facets of KM and about his career. His experience includes leading KM programs and communities in professional services at HP and Deloitte.

What is your definition of Knowledge Management?

Knowledge management is the art of transforming information and intellectual assets into enduring value for an organization’s clients and its people. The purpose of knowledge management is to foster the reuse of intellectual capital, enable better decision making, and create the conditions for innovation.

KM provides people, processes, and technology to help knowledge flow to the right people, at the right time, so they can act more efficiently, effectively, and creatively. Knowledge management enables Sharing, Innovating, Reusing, Collaborating, and Learning.

What are some misconceptions of KM you see regularly?

  1. KM programs should try to implement every KM process and tool
  2. KM programs should start with technology and then roll out tools and drive adoption
  3. KM programs should focus on collecting documents or updating skills profiles
  4. It’s not necessary to meet in person and you can ignore the need to build trust
  5. KM teams can be moved around from one organization to another
  6. KM programs should rely on maturity models and benchmarking
  7. There are “best practices
  8. KM programs should collect and report on all possible metrics
  9. It’s good to get certified in KM
  10. You can delegate KM to others
  11. You can push content
  12. KM is dead and KM needs a new name
  13. You can make people do things and incentives don’t work
  14. Social is frivolous
  15. Creation of communities and ESN groups should not be controlled
  16. Risks can be eliminated
  17. It’s possible to be like Google and Amazon
  18. KM people should try to work themselves out of a job
  19. Bigger is better for organizations, and smaller is better for community membership
  20. Everything is a community
  21. Our IP will be stolen if we don’t lock it down tightly
  22. The DIKW pyramid is useful
  23. The 90-9-1 rule for community participation is obsolete
  24. It’s possible to compute the ROI of KM
  25. Content should be archived after 90 days

(For more see this and this)

What drew you to this field and to become a KM author?

I have always been interested in communication and in sharing information. In elementary school, I published a one-page newsletter. In high school, I operated a radio station. In college, I started out in the journalism school at Northwestern, but I got hooked on computer programming and transferred to the engineering school at Washington University.

I joined Digital Equipment Corporation in 1983, and they already had VAXnotes Conferences, which were early examples of online communities. As a professional services manager, I compiled information useful to my team members that included key contacts and pointers to reference material. The Key Contacts List became one of the most popular documents at Digital.

I edited and published a monthly newsletter called Systems Integration Notes. It was distributed via email, but I wanted to find a way to make it available on demand. Initially I used VAX VMS network transfers for this, and then Digital ALL-IN-1 shared file cabinets. When Digital launched its first intranet in 1995, I knew that this was a much better way to share information, and immediately embraced it. I became the editor of Digital’s Professional Services intranet site.

In 1996 I was asked to start Digital’s first knowledge management program. My background in journalism, computer programming, and information sharing made me a good candidate for this role, and I embraced it enthusiastically. I have been a knowledge manager ever since.

KMWorld 2017 Keynote

In 2004 I took over HP’s KM program. I attended a one-day APQC Proven Practice Replication workshop hosted by Ford. I was impressed by the work of Stan Kwiecien and his Ford KM colleagues, and invited them to present on an HP KM Community call. They did so, and then Stan asked me to present HP’s KM efforts to Ford. I didn’t think that what we were doing at HP was that impressive, but I reciprocated. I was surprised by Ford’s reaction to my talk – they were much more positive about our accomplishments than people at HP were. This inspired me to present and write about our knowledge management efforts, including my first conference presentations at APQC in 2005 and KMWorld in 2006. I submitted an article to Line56.com, and they asked me to write a weekly blog, which I did. When Line56 folded, I moved it to hp.com. When I left HP in 2008, I switched to tweeting. In 2014 I began writing weekly articles on LinkedIn.

I have also been writing articles for periodicals since 2006. One of these, Inside Knowledge, was published by The Ark Group, and they asked me to write a book in 2006, which was published in 2007 as Implementing a Successful KM Program. In 2016, Lucidea (a software company) asked me to write another book, Proven Practices for Promoting a KM Program, which came out in 2017. I have also been asked to contribute chapters to four other books, and I always agree to do so.

In Profiles in Knowledge you share stories of people who have contributed to the field and are no longer with us. What inspired you to do that?

I have written over 400 blog posts, so I have covered most of my original ideas. I wanted to shift my focus to share the great work that others have done. I noticed that for those who have passed away, or left the field of knowledge management, their writing is not always available online. By retrieving it from the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, I was able to bring back their lost content for the benefit of everyone in the field. And by celebrating the work of those who are no longer with us, I am able to remind others of those great ideas and accomplishments. When I do so, their surviving friends, family, and colleagues have expressed their appreciation to me, which is very gratifying.

How has the KM field evolved in the past 10 or 15 years?

The fundamental principles have not changed much over the past 25 years. Some of the approaches and components have evolved. In the initial phase of KM (approximately 1995-2005), the main efforts were related to collection:

  1. capture
  2. lessons learned
  3. proven practices
  4. content management
  5. classification
  6. intranet
  7. portals
  8. repositories
  9. expertise locators
  10. search engines

In the next ten years (2005-2015), Web 2.0 and Enterprise 2.0 developed, and the emphasis shifted to connection:

  1. communities
  2. threaded discussions
  3. tagging
  4. blogs
  5. wikis
  6. podcasts
  7. videos
  8. syndication
  9. aggregation
  10. social software

Since about 2015, new trends have emerged:

  1. There is currently a lot of buzz around the ideas of digital workplace and digital transformation.
  2. Working Out Loud is a growing movement that encourages employees to narrate their work and broadcast what they’re doing so others can interact.
  3. Community management is emerging as a formal discipline where community managers are formally trained, developed, and assigned to full-time roles.
  4. Cognitive computing and artificial intelligence are being used to automate certain KM tasks and augment knowledge-related decision making.
  5. There is increased attention on analytics and business intelligence, which help KM use data to derive insights and inform actions and decisions.
  6. More organizations are adopting enterprise social networks, especially Microsoft and Workplace by Facebook, as a better user interface for online threaded discussions.
  7. Chat tools such as Slack, which are used predominately for team interaction, are gaining in popularity as well.
  8. Gamification and digital badging are new ways of framing incentives to recognize people for performing the knowledge-sharing and collaborative behaviors.
  9. Agile methodology originated in software development but is now being applied more broadly across the enterprise.
  10. Mobile apps and the bring your own device (BYOD) trend are reactions to more and more people using smart phones and tablets for work. KM must ensure that knowledge systems are optimized for mobile.

“Knowledge management is the art of transforming information and intellectual assets into enduring value for an organization’s clients and its people.”

Can you share a major challenge you tackled in your career (with a customer, or personally) and how did you address it?

When I led the HP KM program, there were frequent changes in the top leadership of the HP Consulting & Integration business that I supported. Each time a new senior vice president was named, I had to start over to educate them about KM, the KM program, and what I wanted them to do in support of it.

One new senior VP convened an advisory council of field consultants, and they were very critical of the KM program. I found myself on a conference call with the senior VP and the council members, and it was very difficult. They complained about several things, including the user interface, which they thought was too complicated.

Despite that fact that we offered multiple ways to interact with the KM system, including a standard intranet menu, an engagement knowledge map, and an A-Z index, they wanted a simpler option. Instead of being defensive, we set about to create a simple user interface, and worked with the harshest critic among the council members to design it. When that user was satisfied, and when we had made similar improvements to respond to the other complaints, we reconvened the senior VP and the council, and reviewed all of the changes. The council members embraced what we presented, and we turned around a dire situation.

The moral of this and other incidents we experienced: listen to your constituents, try to just say yes, and continuously improve in response to constructive feedback.

What key piece of advice would you give to an individual who wants to perform KM work or launch a KM program in their organization?

Start out by building expertise in knowledge management.To perform KM work:

  1. Set three simple goals and stick with them for the long term. Communicate them regularly. Incorporate the goals and metrics into as many parts of the organization as possible.
  2. Keep the people, process, and technology components of the KM program in balance. Don’t allow one element (e.g., technology) to dominate the other two.
  3. Lead by example. Model the collaboration and knowledge sharing behaviors you want the organization to adopt in how you run the KM program.

To launch a knowledge management program:

  1. Create a Top 3 Objectives List of challenges and opportunities which your KM program will address. These objectives align business direction with program goals.
  2. Provide 9 Answers to questions about people, process, and technology. This information defines who will participate, which processes will be required, and how tools will support the people and processes.
  3. Define the KM Strategy. These are specific actions which will be taken to implement the program.
  4. Gain the sponsorship of your senior executive through The 10 Commitments. These commitments from the leader of your organization will enable the KM strategy to be implemented.
  5. Create and execute the Implementation Plan. This plan spells out the details of implementing the initiative.

You regularly share recommended resources. What 2 or 3 key resources (books, podcasts, etc.), would you recommend to anyone who wants to know more about KM?

Here are six:

  1. Blog: Knoco Stories by Nick Milton
  2. Book: Working Knowledge by Thomas Davenport and Laurence Prusak
  3. Community: SIKM Leaders Community
  4. Conference: KMWorld
  5. Periodical: K Street Directions by Chris Riemer
  6. Site: Gurteen Knowledge Website by David Gurteen

Do you have questions, feedback or suggestions of people to interview? Contact me! 

Wearing Red for Success: Marielah Dabbah

Marielah Dabbah has many people excited about wearing red shoes. This is not a fashion statement, it is a movement she developed to create awareness about gender equality in the workplace. Through her book Find your Inner Red Shoes, Step into your Own Success and her numerous speaking engagements throughout Latin America and US, she has been giving her message of helping women find success and tap into their strengths.

Helping others find success has been a constant in Mariela’s books. These include bilingual titles such as The Latino Advantage in the Workplace and Help your Children Succeed High School and Go to College. I asked Marielah about her current initiatives, what drives her work choices and some advice for women to succeed in the workplace.

What is the Red Shoe Movement about?

The Red Shoe Movement (RSM) is a leadership development company powered by a global community of women (and men who support them) who support each other for career success. Our mission is to accelerate the representation of women at the highest levels of decision-making. We achieve this with a two- pronged approach. On the one hand we provide leadership training to female talent within organizations to help them move to the next level in their careers. On the other, we conduct cultural awareness and marketing communications initiatives that aim at a global leap of consciousness. A tipping point on the gender equality issue.

Our best known initiative is #RedShoeTuesday, the day when we all wear red shoes and ties to work to support women’s career advancement. It’s an invitation to keep alive the conversation about how we can do to change our culture together in order to level the playing field for 100% of the talent.

“It’s important to know what you want so that you can align your attention with your intention.”

What are some activities you have had?

Every year we have the RSM Signature Event in NYC, which is an experiential leadership event unlike any other. This year’s takes place November 16 at MetLife. We’ll welcome close to 200 mid to high level executives from Fortune 500 companies. As we offer all our programs and our website in English and Spanish, we work a lot in Latin America. So for the last several years we’ve been working with our clients’ female talent in the U.S and across the Latin American region.

In the last couple of years we have organically grown into a communications partner for our clients. We rolled out the “Ring the Bell on the 7 Seas” with Celebrity Cruises, a Red Shoe Movement Gender Equality global initiative to echo the UN’s “Ring the Bell for Gender Equality”. We created a ceremony that was held on the entire Celebrity Cruises fleet and at Royal Caribbean’s offices around the world.

 

Sodexo, Chile

The last time we spoke  you had written a book about helping Latinos find work. Today you are supporting career success for women. What drives your projects and initiatives? How do you decide? 

They are usually a natural evolution that comes from working with different people and learning about their needs. It suddenly becomes apparent what my next focus should be. It happens when I feel I’ve done enough in a particular space and it’s time to take on a new challenge. And if I feel passionately about it, then I explore the topic. So far my initiatives have been kicked off by a book that I wrote on the subject. This may change in the future.

Can you share one essential piece of advice you give women to succeed in their career?

It’s important to know what you want so that you can align your attention with your intention. When you’re not sure what intrigues you, what fulfills you, what moves you, it’s easy to be swayed by others decisions for what you should or shouldn’t do. Once you know what you want, find ways to express it so others understand and direct the right opportunities to you.

Can you share a challenge or failure and what did you learn from it?

It’s hard to point out one mistake as I’ve made many and continue to make many along the way. When you make decisions every day and take on challenging projects, you learn as you go, so failing is an integral part of growing. I don’t even label these occasions “failures.” They are always a point of departure for something new, or to do things in a different way. Making friends with failure is the best you can do to grow faster. So you fail, learn, move on, and at some point you succeed. And you just continue to repeat the process.

Can you recommend 3 resources (book, podcast, etc.) you use to help you become better at what you are doing?

I read a lot both fiction and non-fiction as I find they inspire completely different ideas. And the books I pick are not necessarily only about talent development, gender equality or leadership. I’m finishing now The tangled tree: A radical new history of life by David Quammen. And I recently read Delicacy by David Foenkinos, a great French author. My point is, your mind needs stimulation. And that comes from the most diverse sources. And I’m addicted to podcasts! Revisionist History, Radio Lab, Hidden Brain and Freakonomics are some of my favorites.

Do you have questions, feedback or suggestions of people to interview? Contact me! 

Preaching Good UX: Joe Natoli

User interface (UI) and User Experience (UX) are popular terms in the design and product industry. UI and UX, oftentimes tied together, are commonly seen as secret ingredients you add to a product to “make it pretty.”  Oftentimes, people don’t really quite get them. Joe Natoli has made it his mission to educate people on what UI and UX are really all about, calling himself a UX evangelist.

Through online courses, several articles, his podcast Making UX Work, and various books, Joe wants to make sure people know UI/UX are not a thing you add, but processes to ensure user satisfaction and usability. These do not only apply to products and software; UI and UX principles can be applied to any area of customer service.

I asked Joe about misconceptions of UI and UX, his career and resources to learn more.

You are an expert in UI/UX, but how do you describe what you do?

First, I’ve never been comfortable with the tile of “expert.” I don’t have any magic powers, and I am not the smartest guy in the room. What I do have is close to three decades of experience working with and learning from unique people in unique, challenging situations. Do anything long enough and you learn a whole lot about what works and what doesn’t.

I do, however, believe that one of my strengths is the ability to simplify and clarify what UX and Design really is, and how people and organizations can make those things their allies, integrate that thinking into everything they do. I’m able to make it real, understandable and applicable for them, cut through the ego-driven jargon and artifice that often passes for UX knowledge or expertise.

For clients, I explain that UX isn’t a discrete activity, a specific part or step in the software development process — it’s the entire process. User experiences are the result of everything everybody does, from the people requesting features and functionality to those who decide whether or not those things are possible to those who design and build.

UX is created regardless of whether or not there are UX or UI designers on staff; it’s either intentional or unintentional. And when it’s unintentional, it’s usually bad. So I refer to UX as a value loop, a cycle where both parties have to be satisfied. Good UX delivers value to the people who use a product, and when that happens, value should come back to the organization as well.

What are some misconceptions about UI/UX?

That it’s a step in the process, something that we “do” at specific points in the product design and development process.

People believe that it’s limited to the product itself, which it isn’t. UX is created from every interaction a user or customer has with your organization, which includes things like how customer service answers the phone or responds to social media messages. How easy or hard it is to find self-help information on the corporate website. How long someone has to wait on hold when they call a help line, hearing “your call is very important to us….” every 5 minutes.

People also believe that it’s a “magic bullet” of some kind, that if you designate people and activities as UX or UI, then you can check the box. But more often than not, bad UX is the result of the decisions people make inside an organization, both within and outside the product team. It can be the result of teams or individuals working in silos, not truly collaborating, sharing expertise, or communicating well. Political battles, fear and morale issues that lead to poor decision making. Company cultures where the urgent always trumps the truly important.

Those activities are outside what we think of as “UX” or product use, but they have massive impact in whether or not a user experience is positive or negative.

speaking-001-1440px

What has been one of your greatest challenges and how did you tackle it? 

Dealing with imposter syndrome, which I still do, even though I am in a situation where I can pick and choose what work I take on from global-sized organizations. Even though they come to me, and never question my rates. Even though I have 120,000 students worldwide taking my courses.

I say all that not to impress you or anyone else; I say it because I want everyone reading this to understand that no matter how much you achieve, you cannot expect your fear or self-doubt to suddenly disappear. That’s an unreasonable, unrealistic expectation. So instead of waiting to be fearless, you have to make peace with that fear and go forward anyway.

Part of that is this idea that we have to be 100% original, which also isn’t possible. I think what we all do is to take the gifts other people have given us, and adapt, reimagine and reinterpret them in some way that’s uniquely ours. You may be saying or teaching the same things someone else is, but you’re doing that in a way that only you can.

So you have to learn to trust your voice, your approach, to trust in the fact that what you’re doing has merit. Otherwise you’ll never start.

So taking that big step forward — whether it’s speaking up in a team meeting or taking a risk on a new interactive feature or starting your own business — isn’t a matter of being fearless. It’s a matter of feeling more fear than you know what to do with, but going forward anyway.

What is the main takeaway you want people to have from your courses or your book? 

That UX is not something you do with your hands — it’s the result of how you use what’s between your ears.

I believe that far too much of the “advice” people get on design and UX is unrealistic; it sounds great on paper, but it fails miserably when put into practice in the real world. The one where most businesspeople don’t care about best practices and principles. The one where results — were we get the outcome we’re after — is the only thing that matters.

I think most processes and tools and methods people on my side of the fence promote and suggest are too complex, too rigid and require a perfect-world scenario where you always have enough time, budget, people and executive approval.  So everything I do is meant to be an antidote to that: things that work in the messy reality we all work in.

Can you recommend a few resources (books, websites, etc.) which have helped you and could help others in the field, or who want to learn more? 

Sure. Of course, I have to include a few of my own, because the feedback I get daily from designers, UXers and developers tell me they’re useful and helpful:

Think First, my latest book: I wrote this book to simplify and demystify a great deal of what it really means to apply UX to product development, and what you really need to consider when working with clients and teams. The reason I wrote it was because I got angry — so much of what’s out there talks waaaaay over people’s heads and insists on complex processes, tools, and methods to “properly” practice UX. I think that’s bullshit, so I wrote a book explaining why (and what to do instead).

Making UX Work Podcast: I interview everyday UXers (no rock stars) about what they do every day, how they do it and the challenges they face.

Give Good UX Company of Friends: This is my private Facebook Group. With over 6,000 members, you can learn an awful lot from the good, generous folks there (and I answer questions as well, live and in posts):

Website, Blog + FREE eBooks: I do my best to write articles, create videos and provide free e-books to answer the questions I get from people in the field every day.

Online UX TrainingThese are UX training courses on my own platform.

Udemy UX Video Courses: These are UX training courses on Udemy.

Next, I believe every person related to product development, design or UX in any way should absolutely read the following books cover to cover:

The Inmates Are Running the Asylum, by Alan Cooper; Don’t Make Me Think, by Steve Krug, The Design of Everyday Things, by Dr. Don Norman, The Cluetrain Manifesto (various authors) and Universal Principles of Design (various authors).